Skincare FAQ

Do I need a moisturizer?

As a rule, children rarely need to apply extra moisture to their skin. We have these tiny sponges in our skin called (in short) G.A.G.s which pull moisture from our body and give it to our skin. As we age, these sponges become less efficient at this task. This is partially because women often start applying moisturizers at a young age before they need to. The skin can get conditioned to this. The G.A.G. sponges sense this extra moisture on the skin and stop working as hard to provide the body’s own moisture. The trick is to train, or re-train your skin to produce as much of its own natural moisture as possible. Retinoids are a form of Vitamin A known for their ability to normalize the skin in several ways, including the stimulation of natural moisture production.

That said, even those with naturally supple skin need to apply moisturizer at times: Winter and dry air climates and during/after sun exposure. Sun can be very dehydrating to the skin. The trick is to use moisturizer when you need it, while also encouraging your body to make its own moisture.

Everyone’s skin, lifestyle and environment is different. To determine the best protocol for you, have your skin analyzed by a licensed skincare professional. She/he can provide you with the best plan for more naturally supple, healthy skin.

Do I really need a toner?

Most people do not have a clear understanding about toners, however, a toner can be a very beneficial product for the following reasons…

The first function of a toner is to balance the pH of the skin. When we cleanse our skin, the pH is disrupted. An unbalanced pH interferes with the skin’s ability to function at an optimal level in a variety of ways. Without a toner, the skin can take several hours before the pH returns to normal again. When a toner is applied, the pH is instantly rebalanced and restored. This allows the other products that we apply after toning to work much more efficiently.

In addition, toners have other important functions that address specific skin conditions. Many toners can have an exfoliating, clarifying and anti-bacterial component that reduces dead cell build up and clogged pores. Other toners have antioxidant and hydrating components that are especially beneficial for more fragile ski.

Do I have to wash my face with cleanser if I don’t wear make-up?

During the day, our skin is exposed to more than we realize. Minute particles of everything from dirt, pollutants, free radicals and bacteria attach to our skin. Washing with water alone does not effectively remove all of these unwanted elements. Nighttime is when our skin needs the opportunity to rest and regenerate. A cleanser does not have to be harsh or even foaming. Most importantly, choose one that is sulphate free.

How do I know if I have sun damage?

Any time you get color from the sun, i.e., a burn, or a tan, you have experienced some sun damage. Nobody is born with freckles; freckles themselves are actually sun damage. Not everybody freckles because their skin may produce melanin more evenly. This does not mean, however, that they do not have sun damage.

There are also many people who had freckles when they were younger and they faded. The freckles (sun damage) is still there in the deeper layer of the skin. You can see proof of this when looking at your skin through a skin scanner with a special “black light.” This aids as a useful tool in treatment and precautionary measures. Many skincare providers offer this visual service to their patients.

How often should I get facials?

Some people have greater needs and require more attention than others do. In a perfect world, getting a facial every six to eight weeks is optimum. Others have amazing skin and need very little extractions or special treatment beyond a structured daily routine. For them, a facial at the changing of seasons is especially beneficial to have the skin monitored to incorporate new recommendations and/or alterations to their routine.

Those who have more problematic skin may need to initially schedule facials/peels as frequently as one to two weeks apart for a short time, before they get their skin functioning in a normal way.

Most importantly, what we do with our skin on a daily basis is what makes the biggest difference in our complexion. That is why it is important to check in with your licensed skincare professional on a routine basis.

Is there a difference between over the counter products and versus those from a licensed skin care professional?

In short, yes! While tests show there may not be big differences between drug store vs. expensive department store brands, there is a world of difference between otc vs. professional.

Aestheticians and physicians, who evaluate your skin, are licensed to carry higher concentrations of active ingredients in their products. These higher concentrations make all the difference in the product’s ability to help your skin improve and function at its best.

Should I wear sunscreen if I really don’t go in the sun?

Unless you always have your blinds drawn, never ride in a car, or live in a cave, you are “in the sun.” Most of our photo-aging comes from average, everyday sun exposure.

I’ll never forget a seminar that I once attended. I saw a photo of a woman who had worked in a high rise office building for 25 years with one side of her face exposed to a window. This side of her face was wrinkled with sun spots. The other side that didn’t face the window had very little wrinkles, nor pigmentation and looked about 30 years younger. It was confirmation that one does not have to burn for sun damage to occur.

Is it okay for my sun to be exposed to the skin so I can get Vitamin D?

Many health practitioners do recommend that patients gently expose their skin to the sun for 10-20 minutes a day for Vitamin D stimulation. I look at sun and Vitamin D in much the same way alcohol can have benefits and detriments. The sun encourages Vitamin D production, yet can photo-age your skin.

If you want to expose your skin to the sun for Vitamin D, my recommendation would be to expose an area of skin other than your face. The legs and back have larger areas of skin to absorb more sun, so you need less exposure time.

Does what I eat affect my skin?

We all know that certain medications can treat and/or affect our skin in both positive and negative ways. Some people, more than others, can also be very sensitive to what they eat. History and genetics play a key role in this question. If a food is not healthy for instance, our skin can be used as a means of detox and can form a rash.

We should all take special care to eat well by avoiding simple sugars and processed, hydrogenated foods, but this is especially true for those who smoke and/or have a lot of sun exposure/sun damage.These habits expose the skin to an enormous amount of skin damaging free radicals. As a result, one is much more vulnerable to disease and aging. To partially compensate, it is vital to take additional supplements along with a healthy diet. Vitamin C is especially important as it is quickly depleted by sun exposure and smoking. These actions can do a great deal to help lessen the damaging effects.

We all know that certain medications can treat and/or affect our skin in both positive and negative ways. Some people, more than others, can also be very sensitive to what they eat. History and genetics play a key role in this question. If a food is not healthy for instance, our skin can be used as a means of detox and can form a rash.

We should all take special care to eat well by avoiding simple sugars and processed, hydrogenated foods, but this is especially true for those who smoke and/or have a lot of sun exposure/sun damage.These habits expose the skin to an enormous amount of skin damaging free radicals. As a result, one is much more vulnerable to disease and aging. To partially compensate, it is vital to take additional supplements along with a healthy diet. Vitamin C is especially important as it is quickly depleted by sun exposure and smoking. These actions can do a great deal to help lessen the damaging effects.

Intense Pulsed Light FAQ

1. What is IPL or Intense Pulse Light?

Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) is a non-laser treatment breakthrough that can correct a variety of skin imperfections including signs of sun damage, unwanted hair, various forms of unwanted redness, rosacea and other blemishes.

This low-risk photorejuvenation technology can be used on the face, neck, chest, arms, and hands and does not disrupt the skin’s surface. You can often return to your busy lifestyle immediately following treatment.

Some conditions treatable with Photorejuvenation can include:

  • Age spots
  • Photo-aging – Sun damage
  • Broken Capillaries
  • Small Veins
  • Rosacea
  • Fine Lines
  • Unwanted Hair

2. How many treatments are required?

The number of required treatments varies for each individual condition. For those with only a few minor lesions, one or two sessions may suffice, but on average, most patients receive between three to six treatments to achieve maximum benefits.

3. How is the photo-rejuvenation performed?

You will be given dark goggles to shield your eyes from the bright light of the IPL. A cold gel is applied to the skin and a small glass diode is held over the area of skin to be treated. A bright light then shoots through the diode and onto your skin. You may feel a sting, like the snapping of a small rubber band and/or a quick shot of heat. Anesthetic cream may be used but is seldom necessary.

4. Are there any side effects?

Strong side effects are rare. You may experience some slight reddening or local swelling at the treatment site, but this typically goes away within hours. With some treatments, temporary discoloration on certain areas of the skin may occur. This is usually minor, temporary and can always be covered with makeup until it fades. Our specialist can advise you if you treatment could result in this temporary occurrence.

On rare occasions, some blistering or bruising may occur, but typically resolves quickly. Limiting sun exposure before and after each treatment is necessary and will minimize the risk of complications.

It is contraindicative to get any color from UV rays during the course of treatments. You cannot be treated with the IPL until your tan or burn completely fades.

5. How does the treatment for unwanted hair work?

The intense pulsed light heats the hair follicle and destroys it, without damaging surrounding skin.

Hair with pigment (black, brown, red) can be treated effectively.

Hair may be cut or shaved close to the skin in between treatments, but not removed from the follicle by waxing or plucking.

6. How many treatments are required for permanent hair reduction?

Because hair grows in different cycles, it is important to treat each growth cycle as it comes. As a result, a series of usually 6-8 treatments is required.

7. Will the hair grow back?

On average, while it has been found that in most cases, 70% of the hair does not return. It is recommended that patients schedule maintenance treatments once or twice a year to treat any new, hormonal and stubborn remaining hair growth that may occur.

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